I’ve recently began practicing my techniques, blocking set and kicking sets as well as short form 1 in my very small closet sized bedroom. This may seem counterproductive or ridiculous to some, but it really helps a lot when doing American Kenpo. For Sungadan, it definitely would not work at all. The stances and movement is far too wide for me to make any progress. In contrast, for American Kenpo, it actually helps me keep my form and stances tight and sharp and prevents me from using unnecessary space to do the movements. I find this really beneficial because I have the tendency to do wide large movements if I have the space to do so. Practicing American Kenpo in such a small space does not allow me to practice large movements or wide movements for any of the forms or techniques. I recommend this to anyone who is practincing American Kenpo or anyone who is practicing another martial art that requires small, close to the body sharp movements in each technique. Please leave comments! Let me know how this works for you: what problems do you encounter with this method of practice? What benefits you from working the techniques and forms in this type of space? Are there any other practices that you could recommend? Let me know!

Good luck!

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This is my very first blog posting! :] I’m excited and curious to see where this will lead. To start, I’m doing this blog to track my progress (starting 07/12/10) in American Kenpo as taught to me by my boyfriend, Armando Villanueva Jr., who is a first degree black belt in the art. I have the utmost respect for Armando and am ecstatic if not a little terrified that he is willing to teach me what he knows. If you don’t know what American Kenpo is, you can click here for more information on the history of this martial art: History of American Kenpo for a better explanation than I could ever give you. Back on to my journey with the utmost respect for this art, its founders and its colorful history… :]

For awhile, we only trained on and off very casually, but have recently began pretty intense conditioning. This means a lot of exercise including running, intense squats (using something called a lead bag?WTF?), blocks, strikes, crunches, pull ups (which I cannot even do yet), and push ups (apparently while elevated on chairs! Eek!).

I am pretty afraid of all of this. I have to admit that while I’ve been in a few stupid high school girl fights, I’m terrified of being hit, let alone being hit in the face. I just freak out and go into the fetal position. Not only that, but I’m not exactly in shape. While I’m not considered morbidly obese, I could be thinner. So, I thought this would not only be a great way to stay in shape, but also an amazing experience in which I can learn American Kenpo, get passed my fears of getting hit, and learn something about martial arts; a lifestyle that has fascinated and drawn in the curiosity of many people for thousands of years. And, though this may be a little overeager, overzealous and definitely too early to tell, maybe participate in tournaments in the future. Regardless of what happens, I am very excited and grateful to be taught any martial art at all.

So, moving on respectively… :] (since I am the Queen of Rambling), a lot of conditioning will be had, I may blog about broken, shattered or sprained bones or muscles ( let’s cross our fingers on that one please and thank you) . At any rate, I’m sure he has more in store for us, which he is used to and I am not, than even I can comment on yet. Of course this will eventually involve much more that includes actual American Kenpo techniques, forms AKA Karas, etc., but for now let the conditioning commence!

To end this first blog, I will leave you all with an appropriate quote:

” I come to you with only karate, empty hands. I have no weapons, but should I be forced to defend myself, my principles or my honor; should it be a matter of life or death, of right or wrong; then here are my weapons, karate, my empty hands.”
—Ed Parker – March, 1957